Resource – Judge’s Pack

Resource – Judge’s Pack

This is an old article but we’ve been keeping it updated. I’m bouncing this up again due to the recent change to the end of the time system and Worlds upcoming.

Last updated 17th October 2018

FFG provide a set of important resources already and as these are the official rules and tournament guidelines they are essential. The links below are to the existing files, but you do want to make sure you check to see if there are more up to date versions.

The fun recent changes are no extra fate for going second and a new end of turn sequence. Rounds end after 65 minutes and tiebreaks are counted with the option to concede. If play continues, it goes for another 5 minutes after which wins become modified wins. Then there is only another 5 minutes to finish the game up after which final tiebreakers kick in. So we can expect rounds to end after 75 minutes. Factor in a 15 minutes break between rounds (which might be over generous) and rounds can be consistently completed within 90 minutes. That means a 5 round swiss would take a ‘mere’ 7 hours 30 minutes!

Currently, the most complete source for unofficial rulings is FiveRingsDB.com. Each card lists all the associated rulings which are carefully curated by a fantastic team who make sure only confirmed rulings, despite being unofficial as they aren’t in the rules reference, are added. To compile these I run an R script which uses the websites API to get the list and create a PDF with all the cards listed in alphabetized order.

New addition: We introduced some unofficial floor rules to help Judges out of stick situations. You can find them here:

That’s it.


If you have any comments or feedback please post them in the comments section below. Check us out on the Imperial Advisor website, podcast, and YouTube channel for more discussion about the L5R LCG.

Bazleebub

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2 Replies to “Resource – Judge’s Pack”

  1. Hello Imperial Advisor,
    This is an off-topic post and more of a question, really. Recently the play group at my friendly local game shop has almost disappeared. The consensus is that L5R is like modern architecture: beautiful, precise, and cold. Many players complain about the high variance in the dynasty deck, the dominance of scorps who can skip said phase for a more reliable and effective conflict character party, and the general grind of the game.

    Several players have jumped ship to Netrunner, which they report is much crisper, and with more euphoric moments. Sure, they still take a bad beat every now and then in Netrunner, but the pace of the game and the ability to run it back without getting decision fatigued is appealing in a game. Simply put, playing Netrunner is fun, where L5R is unforgiving work.

    Despite going all-in on L5R, buying a lot of cards and playing a good deal, I can appreciate the critique. What do you guys think? Is the game still exciting for you all, or have you started to feel the grind?

    As always, I appreciate the content. You all put out quality stuff.

    1. Hey Matt,

      Thanks for posting. We like this comment so much the current plan is to do our next episode around it. In short, for me at least:
      * I really love L5R as a game
      * I’m not worried about Scorpion doing well, we’re only a few cards in after all. If they’re dominating in 6 months then we have an issue.
      * I came to L5R from Netrunner which has had its ups and downs, as much as I love them both, there are issues with both games so it isn’t all roses for the corps and runners.
      * After the Warpcon reporting, I took a bit of a break from the game. We’re in a natural lull where we’ve worked out most of the first cycle and are waiting on the first clan pack. That gave me some time to play computer games, paint some miniatures, and enjoy some board games. I’m still looking forward to the Paris Grand Kotei coverage and I’m excited to play with the new cards from the Phoenix clan pack.

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